Dennis Sherwood
The Silver Bullet Machine Manufacturing Company Limited Dennis Sherwood
Contact:  
EMail: dennis@silverbulletmachine.com
Website: http:// www.silverbulletmachine.com/welcome.html
Seminar:

Smart Innovation and Creativity 2008

There is no such thing as 'unintended consequences' 2006

How often have you heard someone refer to 'unintended consequences'? In this session, Dennis Sherwood will argue that there is no such thing as 'unintended consequences' - but there is much evidence of very poor thinking. For surely an 'unintended consequence' is simply an excuse for not having thought things through properly in the first place. "That's all very well," I hear you say, " but things are so complicated, how can anyone 'think things through properly'?". Yes, things are indeed complicated. But surely it is the duty of a wise manager to 'think things through properly'. So that decisions do not backfire, or act as suicide passes to a 'colleague'. So that decisions pass the most stringent test there is - the test of time. The issue is how. And that's what this session is all about: an introduction to the methodology known as 'the systems perspective', a powerful, holistic way of taming the complexity of the real world.

A systems view of teamwork 2006

What, precisely, is a team? And how, exactly, does a team differ from a 'group', (a group being exactly the same people, but behaving in a way which does not warrant the word 'team')? We all know the phrase 'the whole is greater than the sum of its parts', but what, precisely, does it mean? These are important questions, for we all know the power that can be unleashed when a 'group' becomes a 'team' so that, very visibly, the whole does indeed become significantly greater than the sum of its parts. There is, of course, much in the HR literature about teamwork and how to build high-performing teams, but this presentation will take a rather more scientific perspective - applying the insights of systems theory, and introducing the new science of 'organodynamics', which (like its engineering counterpart thermodynamics, the science of how to get useful work out of engines) is all about how to get useful work out of organisations.

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